Thursday, June 23, 2016

Emerald Ash Borer Informational Meeting Tonight


Below is information from the Princeton Shade Tree Commission website about the meeting tonight at town hall.

I've written from many different angles on the subject of Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) in recent years, such as this one. Type "emerald" into this website's searchbox and various posts will come up. The photo shows the size of the insect, and the "D"-shaped exit holes.

A very experienced arborist I spoke to this week told me that he is injecting emamectin benzoate--the active ingredient in Arbor Mectin and TreeAge--for individual or specimen trees, and using imidachloprid where there are dense stands of ash that the homeowner wishes to save. Emamectin benzoate is more expensive but is more effective and lasts longer.

There are no easy answers as to whether to try to save an ash, take it down now, or keep it until it succumbs. All have a financial cost. With 2000 ash trees in Princeton's public right of ways, and many thousands more in parks, preserves and public lands, this little insect introduced from Asia via shipping crates will have an ecological impact on our open space lands and cost Princeton and its residents millions of dollars. Due to the transport of species from one continent to another, all the free ecological, aesthetic, and cooling services ash trees have provided through history will now have a price tag.

Info on the meeting below:

IMPORTANT MEETING ON THE EMERALD ASH BORER: PRINCETON WILL HOST AN INFORMATIONAL SESSION ON PRINCETON'S ASH TREES AND THE EMERALD ASH BORER, THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 7 PM, AT THE PRINCETON MUNICIPAL COMPLEX, 400 WITHERSPOON STREET. EVERYONE IS WELCOME.

1 comment:

Pat Palmer said...

Possibly from inertia (a.k.a. laziness), and partly from dislike of chemicals, I've reluctantly decide on the do-nothing-until-it-succumbs approach. Of course, I also harbor the unrealistic dream, like perhaps others, that my ash tree will be the one that has magical genes and somehow survives the coming infestation. In the meantime, the young ash is providing a much-appreciated screen between a neighbor's upstairs window and our kitchen window.